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1 US CA: Pot Edibles That Look Like Gummy Bears Should Be Illegal ToThu, 14 Sep 2017
Source:Los Angeles Times (CA) Author:McGreevy, Patrick Area:California Lines:31 Added:09/19/2017

California companies would be prohibited from selling marijuana edibles made in the shape of a person, animal, insect or fruit under a measure given final legislative approval Thursday and sent to the governor for consideration.

"We are trying to protect children," said Assemblyman Rudy Salas (D-Bakersfield), who authored AB 350.

Lawmakers said marijuana edibles have been made in the past to look like gummy bears or miniature pineapples. In April, some middle school students in San Diego got sick after a classmate sold them marijuana-laced gummy bears.

The state plans to begin issuing licenses for the sale of recreational marijuana to people 21 and older in January, so lawmakers have introduced several bills aimed at preventing pot from being marketed to minors.

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2 US PA: DA Candidate Endorses Safe Injection Sites For HeroinThu, 14 Sep 2017
Source:Philadelphia Daily News (PA) Author:Whelan, Aubrey Area:Pennsylvania Lines:134 Added:09/19/2017

Democrat Larry Krasner, the front-runner to become Philadelphia's next district attorney, says he supports city-sanctioned spaces where people addicted to heroin can inject drugs under medical supervision and access treatment, a move advocates see as a promising step toward making the city the first in the U.S. to open such a site.

His Republican opponent, Beth Grossman, says she's open to discussions on the matter.

For those on the front lines of the heroin crisis in Philadelphia, both are encouraging stances in a political arena where the idea can still be dismissed out of hand. But recently, cities across the country have begun to consider the possibility of instituting supervised injection sites; several nations, including Canada, have used the approach for years.

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3 US PA: Pennsbury School Board OKs Aggressive Antidrug ProgramTue, 19 Sep 2017
Source:Philadelphia Daily News (PA) Author:Boccella, Kathy Area:Pennsylvania Lines:100 Added:09/19/2017

Just six days after her 28-year-old son died from a heroin overdose, the president of the Pennsbury school board wept as she thanked her colleagues for unanimously approving an ambitious new $149,000 antidrug program aimed at fighting an opioid epidemic that has ravaged young grads in their Lower Bucks County community.

"Thank you all for doing this - now more than ever it means the world to me," a tearful Jacqueline Redner said immediately after the vote. After a decadelong battle with addiction, her son Josh was found dead in a motel room on Sept. 13.

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4 US MA: Question 4 Opponents Will Have Majority On Cannabis CommissionFri, 01 Sep 2017
Source:Worcester Telegram & Gazette (MA) Author:Young, Colin A. Area:Massachusetts Lines:115 Added:09/01/2017

BOSTON -- Marijuana legalization opponents will outnumber supporters four to one on the new commission that will spearhead the state's efforts to get a legal marijuana industry up and running by next summer and then regulate the newly legal market.

Attorney General Maura Healey on Friday appointed Britte McBride, a lawyer with experience working for the attorney general's office, the state Senate and the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, to the newly minted Cannabis Control Commission, and joined Gov. Charlie Baker and Treasurer Deborah Goldberg in agreeing on two picks to round out the five-person panel.

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5 US MA: When It Comes To Marijuana Foods, Regulation Drives InnovationWed, 16 Aug 2017
Source:Boston Globe (MA) Author:Miller, Joshua Area:Massachusetts Lines:171 Added:08/16/2017

DENVER - Many college students will tell you that making pot brownies is easy - just sprinkle a little marijuana into a pan of melting butter, then follow the instructions on the back of the Duncan Hines box.

But marijuana entrepreneurs in this center of cannabis innovation face a much higher bar. They have no trouble dreaming up creative treats and concoctions infused with psychoactive THC, but meeting hundreds of pages of health and safety regulations means their imagination is handcuffed. And for good reason: the rules demand precise dosing, uniform potency, and warning symbols imprinted on the food itself.

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6 US NJ: Energy-Drink Consumption May Lead To Cocaine Use, Study SaysFri, 11 Aug 2017
Source:Herald News (West Paterson, NJ)          Area:New Jersey Lines:71 Added:08/11/2017

Energy drinks could be a gateway to cocaine use, according to a new study.

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Public Health found that young adults who said they'd consumed energy drinks yearly between ages 21 and 24 were at greater risk for subsequently doing cocaine, using prescription stimulants for non-medical uses and problem drinking.

The 1,099 study participants were recruited as 18-year-old college students.

Those who didn't consume energy drinks as they got older were less likely to develop substance-abuse problems.

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7US WI: Gov. Scott Walker Signs Bills Fighting Spread Of OpiatesMon, 17 Jul 2017
Source:Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (WI)          Area:Wisconsin Lines:Excerpt Added:07/21/2017

MADISON -- Gov. Scott Walker signed seven bills Monday to combat the spread of opiates and was set to approve four more.

The 11 measures, which enjoyed broad bipartisan support in the Legislature, would funnel more money into fighting opiates, tighten the ability to get some drugs from pharmacies and give doctors more guidance on treating addiction. They were passed in a special session the Republican governor called in January.

"We've taken serious steps to combat this issue, including creating the Governor's Task Force on Opioid Abuse, but we won't stop until there are zero opioid overdoses in Wisconsin," Walker said in a statement.

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8 US MD: With Opioid Antidote Now Required In All Schools, MoreSat, 15 Jul 2017
Source:Baltimore Sun (MD) Author:Chappell, Emily Area:Maryland Lines:81 Added:07/19/2017

After a year of having an opioid antidote in middle and high schools in Carroll County, a new state law requires that the medicine be available at the elementary school level, too.

The Start Talking Maryland Act, which lays out now-required opioid education at least once at all schooling levels, also requires all schools to carry naloxone, the opioid overdose antidote.

Filipa Gomes, supervisor of Health Services for Carroll County Public Schools, said in addition to the extra naloxone, Carroll County Public Schools staff are training more people how to administer the antidote.

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9 US MD: Maryland's Heroin Fight Turns To Educating Students FromMon, 19 Jun 2017
Source:Baltimore Sun (MD) Author:Wood, Pamela Area:Maryland Lines:181 Added:06/19/2017

In the ongoing battle to stem the heroin and opiate epidemic in Maryland, the newest focus is a state law that mandates teaching students in elementary schools through college about the dangers of the drugs.

Public schools are tweaking drug-education lessons and colleges are preparing sessions for incoming students to comply with the Start Talking Maryland Act, which becomes law July 1.

The act, passed by state lawmakers and signed by Gov. Larry Hogan earlier this year, requires public schools to offer drug-education that includes the dangers of heroin and opiates starting in elementary school.

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10US GA: Student In Drug Search Felt 'violated'Sun, 11 Jun 2017
Source:Atlanta Journal-Constitution (GA) Author:Schrade, Brad Area:Georgia Lines:Excerpt Added:06/11/2017

A federal civil rights lawsuit filed last week against a south Georgia sheriff offers new details of the bizarre school-wide search of hundreds of students where deputies allegedly touched girls' breasts, vaginal areas and groped boys in their groins.

One of the nine Worth County High School students who filed the lawsuit, identified as K.P., told the AJC that the April 14 search was "very, very scary." She said the incident was stuck in her memory and it colored the rest of her senior year.

The day of the search, she said, students didn't know what was happening when an announcement was made early in the day that the school was on lock-down.

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11 US CA: Hills Like Home In Laos. And Now A Crop, Too.Sun, 04 Jun 2017
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Fuller, Thomas Area:California Lines:181 Added:06/09/2017

HAYFORK, Calif. - The red and purple opium poppies that his family grew on a mountainside half a world away were filled with an intoxicating, sticky sap that his mother traded for silver coins to feed her children and pay for their escape.

Adam Lee smiles at the memory of a childhood in war-torn Laos and voyage to America, where he spent decades adapting to life in big cities.

Now 47 years old, Mr. Lee has returned to the mountains - the Trinity Alps of Northern California - and to a career farming a different mind-altering crop for his livelihood: marijuana.

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12 US: Older Women And Cannabis: A Growth IndustrySun, 28 May 2017
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Ellin, Abby Area:United States Lines:148 Added:05/28/2017

Jeanine Moss never expected to get into the cannabis industry. But that was before her hip-replacement surgery.

Ms. Moss, 62, of Marina Del Ray, Calif., had quit her job as a marketing consultant before she had her hip done in 2014. As she left the hospital, her doctors handed her a "shopping bag filled with opiates," she said. The drugs made her disoriented and woozy.

So she switched to medical marijuana, which is legal in California and was familiar to her, having grown up in the nearby Venice section of Los Angeles. Within a week, she had tossed away her pharmaceuticals.

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13 US NY: In School Nurses Room: Tylenol, Bandages And An Antidote ToWed, 29 Mar 2017
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Harris, Elizabeth A. Area:New York Lines:152 Added:03/29/2017

At every school in New Rochelle, just north of the Bronx, in Westchester, there is a locked medicine cabinet in the nurse's office, stocked with things like EpiPens for allergic reactions, inhalers for asthma, Tylenol for aches and pains.

Now, those cabinets also include naloxone, an antidote for people who are overdosing on opioids like heroin. Given as an injection or a nasal spray, naloxone can quickly revive someone who is not breathing. The city keeps it in every nurse's office, including in its elementary schools.

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14 US NY: 19 Deaths In 19 Days In Suspected Opiate OverdosesThu, 19 Jan 2017
Source:Buffalo News (NY)          Area:New York Lines:109 Added:01/19/2017

Nineteen suspected opiate deaths in the first 19 days of January have Erie County on pace for 365 deaths in 2017.

It could be worse. Last year started more deadly.

During the early weeks and months of 2016, the epidemic was claiming so many lives that county officials projected more than 500 people would die that year. The pace, however, slowed as the county took aggressive steps, including promotion of the widespread use of the opiate antidote Naloxone.

By year's end, 247 people had died in confirmed overdoses, with 77 more suspected deaths, officials said Thursday.

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15US NJ: Advocates, Critics React To Christie's Sweeping Drug PlanWed, 18 Jan 2017
Source:Asbury Park Press (NJ)          Area:New Jersey Lines:Excerpt Added:01/18/2017

Anti-drug advocates hailed Gov. Chris Christie's pledge Tuesday to make New Jersey's addiction crisis a top job in the final year of his term in office, but there were worries about funding and follow through.

Using soaring rhetoric, heartfelt personal stories of loss and unmistakable zeal, the governor used his State of the State address to outline a series of new initiatives to battle the opioid epidemic that has devastated New Jersey.

Paul Ressler, who lost his son Corey to a heroin overdose and now runs an organization that informs the public about the use of the opioid overdose antidote naloxone, praised the goal of getting more teenagers into treatment. Christie promised to change state regulations that exclude 18 and 19 year olds from treatment facilities for children.

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16 US MI: Sisters, 16 And 20, Overdose On Heroin In Beverly HillsSat, 14 Jan 2017
Source:Detroit Free Press (MI)          Area:Michigan Lines:84 Added:01/15/2017

Over a 12-hour period in Beverly Hills, two sisters and a boyfriend of one of the them were rushed to the hospital after accidentally overdosing on heroin.

Police say all three are lucky to be alive.

"The boy was the luckiest," said Detective Sgt. Lee Davis of the Beverly Hills Public Safety Department. "Two of our detectives went to his house about the two prior overdoses and they found him totally unresponsive and all alone. If they didn't show up, this probably would have been a totally different story."

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17 US PA: For Babies Born Addicted To Opioids, Hospitals RecruitFri, 13 Jan 2017
Source:Philadelphia Daily News (PA) Author:Mccullough, Marie Area:Pennsylvania Lines:139 Added:01/14/2017

[photo] Addy Schultz, 72, cuddling a baby going through opioid withdrawal at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, ( DAVID SWANSON / Staff Photographer )

Marie McCullough covers health and medicine, with a special focus on cancer and women's health issues.

Study suggests prevention efforts are having an effect on melanoma in Pa., N.J.

As the 13-day-old infant scrunched up his face and squirmed in obvious pain, Addy Schultz tightened her embrace. The baby relaxed in her arms almost instantly.

"When he cramps up, I hold him harder and pat a little firmer," explained Schultz, 72, sitting in a rocking chair in the newborn intensive care unit at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. "They don't like to be stroked or caressed."

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18 US PA: ACA's Repeal Would Devastate Fight Against Opioid AddictionFri, 13 Jan 2017
Source:Morning Call (Allentown, PA)          Area:Pennsylvania Lines:127 Added:01/13/2017

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., told reporters Thursday that Congressional Republicans are on a "rescue" mission to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act and that he and President-elect Donald Trump are in perfect sync with the process of replacing Obamacare. (CHIP SOMODEVILLA/GETTY IMAGES)

Funding for mental illness and opioid addiction treatment in Pennsylvania will take a big hit if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, according to research published this week by Harvard Medical School.

More than 181,000 Pennsylvania residents with mental and substance abuse disorders will lose access to services made available under the ACA, concluded Harvard health economics professor Richard G. Frank and New York University public service dean Sherry Glied.

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19 US MD: Anne Arundel Community College Launches Class On The BusinessSat, 07 Jan 2017
Source:Baltimore Sun (MD)          Area:Maryland Lines:112 Added:01/07/2017

Professor Shad Ewart is teaching a course on emerging markets in relation to marijuana legalization and entrepreneurial pursuits at Anne Arundel Community College.

Start stoner-friendly munchies stands in Colorado. Or open a lounge near a marijuana dispensary in Oregon.

Or try selling fertilizer to weed growers, dude.

"Opportunities are endless, whatever we can create in our heads," said Dean Warner, an Anne Arundel Community College student.

The college launched Monday a class exploring business opportunities around the country's expanding marijuana market.

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20 US PA: In Pa., Facing Two Big Challenges: Opioids, ACAFri, 06 Jan 2017
Source:Philadelphia Daily News (PA)          Area:Pennsylvania Lines:54 Added:01/06/2017

Charles Cutler is an internal medicine specialist from Norristown.

Want to know what's important in medicine today?

Ask Charles Cutler, an internal medicine specialist from Norristown who last month was sworn in as the 167th president of the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

The society's 16,000 members are physicians and medical students throughout the state. Among the issues it promotes are leadership, education, and public health.

Cutler, a member for 35 years, belongs to numerous other medical organizations, including the Board of Trustees of the Montgomery County Medical Society. He is a member of Einstein Physicians Norriton, a part of the Einstein Healthcare Network.

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