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1 CN ON: Mix Of Medicial And Illegal Pot Brings FineThu, 19 Oct 2017
Source:Observer, The (CN ON) Author:Bowen, Neil Area:Ontario Lines:88 Added:10/20/2017

After admitting the medicinal pot in his possession had been illegally supplemented by some non-medicinal pot, a Sarnia man again pleaded guilty Wednesday to drug possession - but to a different judge.

These "additional facts" temporarily put to rest a legal conundrum and likely a Canadian first - whether a lawful prescription becomes unlawful due to use - that delayed a decision on the drug possession charge originally expected in August.

Anthony Francis Barr, 27, of St. Clair Township near Sarnia, had previously pleaded guilty to both driving while impaired and to possessing marijuana. While convicted and fined $1,000 for the impaired driving charge by Justice Mark Hornblower, Barr's prescription for marijuana to deal with an anxiety condition made the possession charge hazier.

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2 CN MB: Column: Weeding Through The ScienceWed, 18 Oct 2017
Source:Winnipeg Sun (CN MB) Author:Prutschi, Edward Area:Manitoba Lines:79 Added:10/20/2017

For a government that promised to legislate using evidence-based science, the rapid approach of legalized marijuana in Canada is starting to look like a case study in blind faith.

Last week, federal justice officials issued the next round of details in their impending pot law.

In addition to existing impaired-by-drug laws that police are already using to prosecute drugged drivers, three new criminal offences are destined to be born to deal with pot-impaired driving all based on the quantity of THC found in a person's body.

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3 CN NF: Editorial: Clock's TickingMon, 16 Oct 2017
Source:Gulf News, The (CN NF)          Area:Newfoundland Lines:74 Added:10/20/2017

It must have been a busy meeting. A couple of weeks ago, Canada's federal and provincial justice and public safety ministers met in Vancouver for two days of meetings. They talked about delays in the criminal system and reforms to the Criminal Code over mandatory minimum sentencing provisions. About changes to the bail system and simpler and faster court proceedings.

They talked about national security legislation and the safety of Canadians, about the legalization of marijuana and the nuances of home cultivation, and the health and safety effects of the drug, both on adults and the particular risks for young people. There was discussion about changing the rules on drunk driving to make it easier for police officers to require drivers to submit to breath testing, and on and on.

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4 CN AB: MADD Urges Alberta Pursue Public Model On Cannabis To EnsureFri, 06 Oct 2017
Source:Edmonton Sun (CN AB) Author:Bennett, Dean Area:Alberta Lines:97 Added:10/11/2017

The advocacy group Mothers Against Drunk Driving wants Alberta to sell marijuana through government-run stores - at least in the short term - to ensure public safety before profit.

Andrew Murie, the CEO of MADD, points to marijuana stores in the United States that slash prices to mark the annual April 20 counter-culture celebration of public cannabis consumption.

"There are a lot of people that want to make a lot of money on this legalization, a lot of entrepreneurs, and they're not interested in public safety," Murie said in an interview Thursday.

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5 CN ON: LTE: Police Not Ready For MarijuanaSat, 07 Oct 2017
Source:Intelligencer, The (CN ON) Author:Comeau, Larry Area:Ontario Lines:51 Added:10/11/2017

Yet another progressive government obviously more concerned with raking in expected windfalls from selling pot, rather than being concerned over the potential harm to young people.

Studies in the U.K., the USA and Canada have conclusively shown young people smoking pot run a greatly enhanced risk of damaging their developing brains and suffering psychosis and other mental issues later in life. Our own Canadian Medical Associate has stated nobody should smoke this dangerous drug, containing 85 canninbinoids with unknown long-term health and mental consequences, under 21.

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6 CN ON: Editorial: Move Carefully On Cannabis TaxesFri, 06 Oct 2017
Source:Hamilton Spectator (CN ON) Author:Roe, John Area:Ontario Lines:82 Added:10/11/2017

The first legal sales of recreational marijuana in Canada are still months away, but some provincial premiers are already demanding a bigger piece of the action.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's opening offer this week to evenly split a 10-per-cent excise tax on cannabis sales between Ottawa and the provinces was quickly scorned by premiers such as Alberta's Rachel Notley and Quebec's Philippe Couillard.

With heady visions of new revenue streams cascading into their provincial coffers, these and other premiers told Trudeau the provinces will bear most of the costs of legalizing cannabis. Hence, they deserve most of the tax dollars that will come with it - not just half.

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7 CN NF: Editorial: Clock's TickingTue, 10 Oct 2017
Source:Telegram, The (CN NF)          Area:Newfoundland Lines:75 Added:10/10/2017

It must have been a busy meeting. A couple of weeks ago, Canada's federal and provincial justice and public safety ministers met in Vancouver for two days of meetings. They talked about delays in the criminal system and reforms to the Criminal Code over mandatory minimum sentencing provisions. About changes to the bail system and simpler and faster court proceedings.

They talked about national security legislation and the safety of Canadians, about the legalization of marijuana and the nuances of home cultivation, and the health and safety effects of the drug, both on adults and the particular risks for young people.

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8 CN ON: Who's Minding The Pot?Thu, 05 Oct 2017
Source:Delhi News-Record, The (CN ON) Author:Gamble, Susan Area:Ontario Lines:95 Added:10/06/2017

Norfolk police board, county seek answers on personal grow-ops

Health Canada is handing out licences for people to grow marijuana for personal use, but the question of who will be monitoring that growth has stymied both the Norfolk police board and council.

"The federal government allows the licence but who's following up on this?" asked Mayor Charlie Luke at last week's police board meeting.

"Who's checking to see that they're abiding by the licence? Is it the feds? The OPP? Certainly it's not the county and I'm thinking these personal grow operations are going to be way out of control."

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9 CN ON: Horgan Touts Marijuana PreparednessWed, 04 Oct 2017
Source:Globe and Mail (Canada) Author:Woo, Andrea Area:Ontario Lines:72 Added:10/06/2017

During first ministers meetings, Premier hints that B.C., unlike Ontario, may leverage dispensaries in its legalized drug regime

Premier John Horgan has hinted again that British Columbia's growing number of illegal marijuana dispensaries could have a role to play when recreational use of the drug is made legal next summer.

Mr. Horgan, who in the past has voiced support for bringing existing operators on board, seemed to suggest on Tuesday that B.C.'s robust marijuana industry means the province is already well positioned to begin legal retail sales by the federal government's July 1 target.

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10 CN MB: PUB LTE: Drug Regulation Is KeyWed, 04 Oct 2017
Source:Winnipeg Free Press (CN MB) Author:Storie, Jerry Area:Manitoba Lines:36 Added:10/06/2017

Re: Plan to police cannabis-impaired driving full of holes: experts (Sept. 29)

Can we stop the parade of nonsense about the dangers of the legalization of marijuana? People have been smoking marijuana for decades and the idea that there will be a crush of people rushing to use this drug and drive is unfounded. You cannot stop drug use by criminalizing it. You simply create victims and drug dealers.

In my opinion, there should be two categories of drugs: recreational - such as alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, nicotine and marijuana - that we regulate, and ones that are available by prescription. Prescription drugs like opioids, and unregulated non-prescription drugs, like Tylenol, cause more deaths than all the recreational drugs combined.

We know recreational drugs like alcohol and nicotine cause problems for some; making them legal won't change that, but it will create fewer victims and casualties than drug wars.

Jerry Storie

Winnipeg

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11CN BC: Column: California Has Blazed Retail Pot Trail For B.C.Mon, 02 Oct 2017
Source:Vancouver Sun (CN BC) Author:Mulgrew, Ian Area:British Columbia Lines:Excerpt Added:10/06/2017

B.C. should follow California's lead as it transitions to a legal cannabis environment and authorizes retail marijuana sales next July.

Both jurisdictions are pot-culture capitals and are dealing with too-tight deadlines and too many nuanced problems to properly meet expectations.

California state voters in 2016 endorsed Proposition 64, which approved legal cannabis with retail pot sales starting Jan. 1, 2018.

As of November, adults over 21 could possess (and give each other) up to 28 grams, as well as seven grams of hash, and they can grow up to six plants.

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12 CN AB: Alberta Takes Public-Private Tack On Cannabis SalesThu, 05 Oct 2017
Source:Globe and Mail (Canada) Author:Cryderman, Kelly Area:Alberta Lines:114 Added:10/05/2017

Blueprint for recreational marijuana sales shares key similarities with proposals in Ontario and New Brunswick, but also shows how varied the provincial approaches will be upon legalization, Kelly Cryderman reports from Calgary

Alberta has joined in the rush by provinces to adapt to Canada's rapidly approaching marijuana legalization, with a draft plan that sets the minimum age at 18 and allows for public consumption in some areas. But the province is undecided on whether storefront sales will be managed by government monopoly or private interests.

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13 Canada: Column: It's Time To Face Facts And Admit Drugged DrivingThu, 05 Oct 2017
Source:Globe and Mail (Canada) Author:Ibbitson, John Area:Canada Lines:97 Added:10/05/2017

When marijuana use becomes legal next July, more people will drive drugged. Because there is no breath-analysis machine available, police will have a hard time detecting these drivers and securing convictions. Proposed measures to make it easier for police to lay a charge are cumbersome, expensive and possibly unconstitutional.

That doesn't mean the Trudeau government should abandon plans to legalize marijuana. But we should face facts.

"If you're saying to me, 'With these new measures, drug-impaired driving enforcement won't be at a level to have a dramatic deterrent impact on behaviour,' I agree with you," says Robert Solomon, a law professor at the University of Western Ontario who is director of legal policy for Mothers Against Drunk Driving Canada.

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14 CN AB: Column: Weed Out The Bad IdeasThu, 05 Oct 2017
Source:Edmonton Sun (CN AB) Author:Gunter, Lorne Area:Alberta Lines:107 Added:10/05/2017

Alberta NDP's cannabis retail rules could work, as long as sales remain in the private sector

The Notley government's proposed rules for legal pot sales in Alberta, released Wednesday, might just work.

The key will be whether the NDP can be convinced to let private retailers sell weed, rather than selling it through government-owned stores run by bureaucrats and staffed by union members.

The proposals deal with who may buy weed and where, how it may be marketed and how to keep dope-impaired drivers off our roads and toked-up workers out of the workplace.

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15 CN ON: Detecting Impaired Driving By Cannabis A Concern For PoliceTue, 26 Sep 2017
Source:Kingston Whig-Standard (CN ON) Author:MacAlpine, Ian Area:Ontario Lines:117 Added:09/29/2017

The legalization of cannabis and the challenge of detecting drivers who are high on Ontario roads once the drug is legalized on Canada Day next year is one of the many community safety subjects being discussed at the Ontario Chiefs of Police board of directors meeting at the Four Points by Sheraton in Kingston on Monday and Tuesday.

Some of the other items being discussed by the 18-member board include public policy changes in Ontario, the future of policing, new legislation on the Safer Strategy for Ontario, and further investment in the Ontario Police College.

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16CN PI: OPED: Sell Pot At The LCCTue, 26 Sep 2017
Source:Guardian, The (CN PI) Author:Jackson, Karen Area:Prince Edward Island Lines:Excerpt Added:09/28/2017

UPSE supports public model for marijuana

The federal government is set to legalize marijuana in July 2018.

The P.E.I. government indicated that it will introduce legislation to regulate the sale of the product in the spring. Recently, in Ontario the government has chosen to distribute the sale of marijuana through the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO). The government and the province's public sector union agree that having the LCBO regulate the sale of cannabis is the best way to protect minors from purchasing the product, and to ensure quality control and public safety.

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17 CN BC: Guest Editorial: Input Sought For Pot OutlookTue, 26 Sep 2017
Source:Prince George Citizen (CN BC) Author:Mulgrew, Ian Area:British Columbia Lines:98 Added:09/28/2017

The fledgling B.C. NDP government has decided how it will deal with the looming legalization of marijuana: continue talking it to death.

Dispensary owners, illegal producers, consumers, patients, parents - Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth explained Monday that everyone's opinion is being sought because "one size does not fit all" and "we need to get it right."

Until four o'clock on the Day of the Dead, Nov. 1, Farnworth says anyone can participate in a new province-wide conversation on pot - the minimum age, personal possession limits, public consumption, drug-impaired driving, personal cultivation, distribution, retail models … It's all on the table. "We want to hear from as many people as possible about how we can best protect our kids, keep our roads safe and lock criminals out of the non-medical cannabis industry," he told a packed meeting room at the annual Union of B.C. Municipalities conference in downtown Vancouver. "Public engagement is crucial."

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18CN BC: Column: NDP Seem In No Hurry To Draft Provincial MarijuanaTue, 26 Sep 2017
Source:Vancouver Sun (CN BC) Author:Mulgrew, Ian Area:British Columbia Lines:Excerpt Added:09/28/2017

The fledgling B.C. NDP government has decided how it will deal with the looming legalization of marijuana: continue talking it to death.

Dispensary owners, illegal producers, consumers, patients, parents - Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth explained Monday that everyone's opinion is being sought because "one size does not fit all" and "we need to get it right."

Until 4 p.m. on the Day of the Dead, Nov. 1, Farnworth says anyone can participate in a provincewide conversation on pot - the minimum age, personal possession limits, public consumption, drug-impaired driving, personal cultivation, distribution, retail models ... It's all on the table.

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19 CN ON: Judge Adjourns Medical Pot RulingTue, 26 Sep 2017
Source:Observer, The (CN ON) Author:Bowen, Neil Area:Ontario Lines:64 Added:09/28/2017

Sorting out whether possession of medical marijuana can become a crime remains in the hands of a Sarnia judge after a brief court appearance Monday.

Justice Mark Hornblower said there is a unique point of law he must be satisfied with before accepting a man's guilty pleas to marijuana possession. The issue is whether involvement of the medical marijuana in another crime makes the possession a crime.

After short submissions by Crown and defence lawyer, Hornblower adjourned his decision to Oct. 18.

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20 CN ON: How To Deal With Drug-Impaired Driving Remains Work InTue, 26 Sep 2017
Source:Globe and Mail (Canada) Author:Moore, Oliver Area:Ontario Lines:100 Added:09/28/2017

There will be zero tolerance for cannabis among young, novice and commercial drivers, the Ontario government announced last week, with the province's Premier and Transportation Minister standing before a carefully curated group of police and safety advocates to deliver the uncompromising message.

"We are proposing to strengthen our impaired driving laws," said Steven Del Duca, who heads the Transportation Ministry. "Let me be clear, driving while impaired is not acceptable and will not be tolerated."

Ministerial handouts spelled out the proposed new regime, saying that young, novice and commercial "drivers should not get behind the wheel if they have any detectable presence of drugs or alcohol in their system."

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