Chellgren, Mark 1/1/1997 - 31/12/2017
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1 US KY: Finding Meaning In Statistics Is DifficultMon, 18 Jul 2005
Source:Lexington Herald-Leader (KY) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:83 Added:07/21/2005

Finding Meaning In Statistics Is Difficult

FRANKFORT - Crime was down in Kentucky in 2004. Or crime was up in Kentucky. It depends on perspective and the interpretation of the statistics provided in the annual report compiled by the Kentucky State Police.

KSP Capt. Lisa Rudzinski cautioned against drawing too many conclusions from the report, despite its volume and detail.

"I don't think you can say anything about a crime trend based on one year," Rudzinski said.

But there is a snapshot that can be viewed and while parts of it might seem encouraging, the overall view is of a state troubled by crime, especially drugs.

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2 US KY: Female Inmate Population Rocketing From Drug CrimesWed, 16 Mar 2005
Source:Lexington Herald-Leader (KY) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:90 Added:03/17/2005

FRANKFORT, Ky. - Kentucky's female prison population is growing at a faster rate than male inmate totals, fueled by drug-related crimes and perhaps a new attitude toward prosecuting and sentencing female offenders.

The number of women with felony convictions incarcerated in Kentucky grew by nearly a fourth, from 1,387 in June 2003 to 1,728 in December 2004, according to Corrections Department figures. Less than 40 percent of the total is housed at Kentucky's only women's prison at Pewee Valley in Shelby County. The rest are scattered around county jails, halfway houses and treatment centers.

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3US KY: Appeals Court Faults Roadblock Search In ButlerSat, 08 Dec 2001
Source:Courier-Journal, The (KY) Author:Chellgren, Mark R Area:Kentucky Lines:Excerpt Added:12/09/2001

Guilty Plea In Drug Case Thrown Out

FRANKFORT, Ky. -- The Kentucky Court of Appeals yesterday threw out a guilty plea in a drug case because the evidence came from an unconstitutional roadblock put up by the Butler County sheriff.

A unanimous three-judge panel of the court said the sheriff's office used the pretense of a roadblock set up to detect traffic and drunkendriving cases to actually search for drugs. Judge Joseph Huddleston said traffic roadblocks must be narrowly focused so they do not infringe on people's rights to avoid improper searches. "Key . . . is whether there are adequate limits on the discretion of the individual officers conducting the roadblock," Huddleston said.

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4 US KY: Latest Hemp Research Efforts Off To Another Slow StartTue, 20 Nov 2001
Source:Messenger-Inquirer (KY) Author:Chellgren, Mark R Area:Kentucky Lines:69 Added:11/20/2001

FRANKFORT -- The latest efforts to study the viability of industrial hemp are off to another slow start, stymied by bureaucratic delays and running headlong into a federal prohibition.

The Kentucky Industrial Hemp Commission met Monday, well after the July 1, 2001 deadline set by the legislation passed earlier this year that created it.

While the University of Kentucky has applied to conduct research on the agronomy of growing hemp, the Department of Agriculture has not even created the regulations needed to grant a license for the research. And even then the Drug Enforcement Administration must be asked for a permit to conduct the research, which it does not have to grant.

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5 US KY: Hemp Research Effort Is Off to a Slow StartTue, 20 Nov 2001
Source:Lexington Herald-Leader (KY) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:55 Added:11/20/2001

FRANKFORT -- The latest efforts to study the viability of industrial hemp are off to another slow start, stymied by bureaucratic delays and running headlong into a into a federal prohibition.

The Kentucky Industrial Hemp Commission met yesterday, well after the July 1 2001, deadline set by the legislation passed earlier this year that created it.

Although the University of Kentucky has applied to conduct research on the agronomy of growing hemp, the Department of Agriculture has not even created the regulations needed to grant a license for the research. Even then the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) must be asked for a permit to conduct the research, which it does not have to grant.

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6US KY: Hemp Research In KY Draws NearThu, 08 Mar 2001
Source:Cincinnati Enquirer (OH) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:Excerpt Added:03/08/2001

Senate Votes Approval, 26-11

FRANKFORT -- Kentucky will try to undertake research into the agricultural and economic viability of industrial hemp, despite another round of legislative warnings that it will lead to legalized marijuana.

The Senate on Wednesday voted, 26-11, to approve the research, which is not a foregone conclusion in any event. No research would begin until a university is selected, which then must obtain required permits from federal drug-enforcement authorities. Only Hawaii has obtained such federal permission.

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7 US KY: Innocent Can Get Caught By Drug Tax LawMon, 05 Mar 2001
Source:Evansville Courier & Press (IN) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:105 Added:03/05/2001

FRANKFORT, Ky. -- This isn't the same kind of taxation without representation debate that prompted some Revolutionary War era patriots to board the British vessels at Boston and toss crates of tea overboard.

It isn't the same kind of tea, either, for that matter.

This is a debate over taxing drugs -- the illicit kind.

In 1994, the General Assembly passed the "Marijuana & Controlled Substances Tax Act." As presented by its sponsors at the time, the idea was to get at the heart of the drug trade by making it a financial burden as well as a risk of penitentiary time.

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8 US KY: Wire: Hemp Debate May Revive In Tobacco Money TussleWed, 12 Apr 2000
Source:Associated Press Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:67 Added:04/13/2000

FRANKFORT, Ky. - House and Senate negotiators reached a tentative agreement late Tuesday about how to divide tobacco settlement funds.

The compromise would direct that 35 percent of the proceeds of the settlement set aside for agriculture be earmarked for specific counties, based on their economic dependence on tobacco.

The remaining 65 percent would be apportioned by a state board with leeway to select projects, intiatives and research to benefit all areas of agriculture.

"I couldn't tell you we have any rock-solid agreements on anything," said Rep. Joe Barrows, D-Versailles, the leader of a House group that wanted most of the money going to tobacco counties.

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9US KY: Actor Faces Trial For Pot PossessionFri, 24 Mar 2000
Source:Los Angeles Times (CA) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:Excerpt Added:03/25/2000

FRANKFORT, Ky.--Actor Woody Harrelson today lost his battle to draw a legal line between industrial hemp and its narcotic cousin marijuana.

The Kentucky Supreme Court ruled there is no difference and said Harrelson has to go back to Lee County to be tried for possession of marijuana.

Harrelson planted four hemp seeds in 1996, knowing he would be arrested so he could challenge the law outlawing possession of any part of the cannabis plant.

Through three different courts, the star of "Natural Born Killers" and "The People vs. Larry Flynt" has argued the statute is unconstitutional because it does not distinguish between marijuana and hemp, which contains only minute amounts of the substance that makes marijuana smokers high, tetrahydrocannabinol or THC.

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10 US KY: Wire: High Court Says Harrelson Must Be Tried For MarijuanaThu, 23 Mar 2000
Source:Associated Press Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:56 Added:03/23/2000

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) -- Actor Woody Harrelson today lost his battle to draw a legal line between industrial hemp and its narcotic cousin marijuana.

The Kentucky Supreme Court ruled there is no difference and said Harrelson has to go back to Lee County to be tried for possession of marijuana.

Harrelson planted four hemp seeds in 1996, knowing he would be arrested so he could challenge the law outlawing possession of any part of the cannabis plant.

Through three different courts, the star of "Natural Born Killers" and "The People vs. Larry Flynt" has argued the statute is unconstitutional because it does not distinguish between marijuana and hemp, which contains only minute amounts of the substance that makes marijuana smokers high, tetrahydrocannabinol or THC.

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11 US KY: Wire: Kentucky Governor Guarding Against ComplacencySat, 16 Oct 1999
Source:Associated Press Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:65 Added:10/18/1999

Patton, a Democrat who is the first Kentucky governor in two centuries to be eligible to seek successive terms, has drawn no serious opposition. He faces an oddball Republican who was all but abandoned by her party, and another candidate -- adopted by the Reform Party -- who has lost three previous statewide campaigns and has backed legalization of marijuana.

Patton has ``made a pretty good Republican,'' said GOP state Sen. Albert Robinson. ``I think that's one reason he's not had serious opposition.'' A millionaire former coal mine operator who served a term as lieutenant governor, Patton spends most of his campaign appearances warning supporters against complacency. He has made a plea for a big vote, a mandate for Patton to enter the uncharted territory of a second term.

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12 US KY: Wire: Candidate Begins Third Run For Governor As ReformThu, 01 Jul 1999
Source:Associated Press Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:56 Added:07/02/1999

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) -- Hemp activist, libertarian and self-proclaimed maverick Gatewood Galbraith began his third campaign for Kentucky governor Thursday as a Reform Party candidate buoyed by the success of Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura.

Galbraith said voters were tired of the "donkey-elephant patty-cake game," a reference to the animal symbols of the Democratic and Republican parties, respectively.

He said Ventura' s surprise victory over mainstream party candidates last year showed voter displeasure.

"He proved that a vote for a third party was not a wasted vote," Galbraith said.

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13 US KY: Tobacco Firm Searches For A Safer CigaretteFri, 30 Apr 1999
Source:Standard-Times (MA) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:92 Added:04/30/1999

LEXINGTON, Ky. - Tobacco companies have tried cabbage, cloves and all sorts of different things to make a safer cigarette that people might actually want to smoke.

Now, one company is attempting to remove a potentially carcinogenic compound from tobacco and still leave the cigarette palatable.

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. is experimenting with a curing process developed by a small Richmond, Va. firm to remove some of the nitrosamines from tobacco. Nitrosamines, which are related to nicotine, cause cancer in laboratory animals. They are among dozens of carcinogens in cigarettes.

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14US KY: Tobacco Deal Fuels Debate On HempMon, 18 Jan 1999
Source:Louisville Courier-Journal (KY) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:Excerpt Added:01/18/1999

FRANKFORT, Ky. - The threat to tobacco from the multistate settlement with cigarette makers has heightened the debate over hemp.

One side makes it out as a wonder weed the cure for the economic ills of farmers; a miracle medicine; and an endless source of oil, fiber and products from cosmetics to furniture coverings, fiberglass and food supplements.

The more restrained view of hemp is as a novelty with limited economic prospects because of competition from cheaper materials and a dearth of processing facilities.

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15 US KY: Harrelson Asks Pot Law be OverturnedWed, 7 Oct 1998
Source:Lexington Herald-Leader (KY) Author:Chellgren, Mark R. Area:Kentucky Lines:28 Added:10/07/1998

(Picture: Actor Woody Harrelson, center, Joe Hickey, left, Executive Director of the Kentucky Hemp Growers Cooperative, and Donna Cockrel, former Simpsonville school teacher, outside the Kentucky Court of Appeals in Frankfort yesterday)

FRANKFORT -- In the battle to legalize hemp, a crop proponents claim has a wondrous future in medicine, fiber, fuel and food, actor Woody Harrelson considers Kentucky the front line.

Harrelson, who owns part of a company that markets products made from hemp, planted four industrial hemp seeds in Lee County in June 1996. Since then, he has tried to force the courts to recognize a difference between hemp and its narcotic cousin, marijuana.

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16US: Hemp Advocates Sue Government To Rescind Ban On PlantMon, 18 May 1998
Source:Orange County Register (CA) Author:Chellgren, Mark Area:United States Lines:Excerpt Added:05/18/1998

Farmers seek an official distinction between the product and its narcotic cousin.

LEXINGTON, Ky. - Farmers, a hemp company and a trade organization sued the government Friday to get the 26-year ban on growing industrial hemp lifted, contending that Congress never intended for it to be illegal.

The lawsuit by six would-be hemp farmers, the Kentucky Hemp Growers Cooperative and the Hemp Co. of America contends that hemp's illegal status violates a 1937 determination by Congress that the plant doesn't share the psychoactive effects of its cousin, marijuana.

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