US: Is This the Answer to Drug Use? (Letters)
Found: 9

1 US: Is This the Answer to Drug Use?Sun, 25 Mar 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Hocieniewski, David Area:United States Lines:308 Added:03/24/2007

KRISTIN SOMERS was sitting in her 10th-grade English class at Hackettstown High last year when a call came over the intercom telling her to report to the office. Immediately.

An honors student with a 3.8 average here in northwestern New Jersey, she wasn't being summoned to discuss her academic performance. And while she participates in an array of after-school organizations - from soccer and softball to the National Honor Society and Key Club - the issue wasn't her extracurricular activities or future plans.

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2 US NY: PUB LTE: The War on Drugs, Now in SchoolsSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Papa, Anthony Area:New York Lines:39 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

Re "Is This the Answer to Drug Use?" (March 25):

Students are now on the front lines of the war on drugs. Whether it be random, suspicionless student drug testing, or having police dogs sniffing around school lockers for drugs, students are now feeling the heavy-handedness of the government's efforts to keep them "drug-free."

The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy is trying to persuade local educators across the country to apply random, suspicionless drug tests by conducting regional summits. This policy is unsupported by available science and opposed by leading experts in adolescent health.

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3 US NY: LTE: Random Drug Tests for High SchoolersSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Aromando, Robert L. Area:New York Lines:46 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

Re "Is This the Answer to Drug Use?" (March 25):

As a parent of two children who graduated from Delaware Valley Regional High School and an expert in the field of student drug testing, I absolutely support random student drug testing as a deterrent to help solve the problem of teenage drug use. I have been a very active participant at the high school in a variety of capacities, mostly with the school marching band as a chaperone, and can tell you that every school in our state has an issue with student drug use; to deny it is ludicrous and being ignorant to what peer pressure can do to our children.

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4 US NY: PUB LTE: Random Drug Tests for High SchoolersSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Mainardi, Priscilla Area:New York Lines:43 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

I have opposed random drug testing since it began two years ago at Pequannock Township High School. My daughter had to agree to it to join the tennis team. For her it is an unnecessary invasion of privacy. Drug testing undermines the trust between my daughter and me, built at home by example and by my active presence in her life. It is not the school's responsibility to raise our daughter, but to teach her.

More distressing are the parents who sign their children up for "voluntary" random testing, when it is not required for extracurricular activities. Do the parents feel this somehow lets them off the hook?

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5 US NY: LTE: Random Drug Tests for High SchoolersSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Dobbs, Kathleen A. Area:New York Lines:40 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

Student drug testing is needed in all the schools in the United States. Our children are dying at an alarming rate in this country. The weapon of mass destruction is right here; it's called addiction. Schools need to step up and starting helping to fight this so-called war rather then hiding it.

My own son was buying his cocaine in a special-ed classroom in a suburb of Southern New Jersey. Maybe had they drug-tested him it wouldn't have gone on as long as it did. It's not that I was in denial; I had no idea what to look for and never thought he would use drugs.

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6 US NY: LTE: Random Drug Tests for High SchoolersSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Evans, David G. Area:New York Lines:23 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

Random student drug testing works. We had it in my children's high school and it reduced drug use and gave the kids a reason to say no to drugs. This is just common sense.

David G. Evans

Pittstown

[end]

7 US NY: PUB LTE: Random Drug Tests for High SchoolersSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Zohn, Edward Area:New York Lines:38 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

Random drug testing for students is offensive. The "safety for the children" argument is just not compelling; it has always been a fundamental truism that the important thing is almost never "what is done" but is always "who gets to decide what is done." Whether testing is good or bad is a matter of personal opinion, but the parents should be the ones who decide.

Liberals want to allow my daughter to have abortion on demand without parental approval, and conservatives want to mandate drug testing without parental approval. Yet, if my under-18 child harms another person or destroys property, it is my wife and I who are responsible. Does this make sense?

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8 US NY: LTE: Random Drug Tests for High SchoolersSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Chase, Theodore Area:New York Lines:24 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

Students might feel better about random drug testing, and it would seem fairer, if teachers, administrators and school board members were also randomly tested. After all, we wouldn't want our kids entrusted to anyone under such influences, would we?

Theodore Chase Jr.

Princeton

[end]

9 US NY: PUB LTE: Random Drug Tests for High SchoolersSun, 01 Apr 2007
Source:New York Times (NY) Author:Stout, Allegra Area:New York Lines:38 Added:04/02/2007

To the Editor:

As a 17-year-old junior at Montville Township High School, I find the idea of random drug testing in schools to be a gross violation of students' civil liberties.

School officials should certainly be able to take action based on students' actual behavior during school hours, but it is not their place to investigate students' irrelevant weekend activities. Furthermore, extracurricular activities are an excellent alternative to drug use, and pushing students away from them (either by making consent forms mandatory in the first place or by punishing drug use) only serves to take that alternative away from at-risk students.

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